CHICAGO | Greyhound Busterminal Redevelopment (630 W Harrison Street)

It can become a future project if it is sold.


Site map of Greyhound station via Google Maps

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I wonder if any new development with include a new grethound terminal. Seems like it would be a boon

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I’ve read that a new development on this site may include residential. I can’t think of a better place for human beings to reside than right at the junction of two of the busiest expressways in the Midwest.

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Does anybody know, has this been the site of the Greyhound station for a long time? Seems to me I used to go there (looking for trouble or going home) fresh out of high school and I thought it was more in the loop proper. I remember it was very convenient to bus and subway lines.

This says the year built was 1989

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The Greyhound bus terminal was at Clark & Randolph in the Loop until 1989.

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It looked kind of nice when it opened:

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And like the Port Authority Bus Terminal in NYC, it became unsafe and fell on hard times.

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Thank you. I went there from time to time at night '72/74 in order to get on a bus and it wasn’t that bad at least for me being a big guy that didn’t look rich. It wasn’t the kind of place most people would want to hang around. You could get to Indianapolis for $5.00.

If a Greyhound bus station is included in a new development at this location, that would be the most surprising Chicago real-estate news in ages.

I imagine private developers would want to avoid the nuisances (fumes, crime, loitering) that most folks associate with intercity bus stations.

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a small NY PABT wouldn’t be bad…

with a real supertall I hope.

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Bus stations are kind of a necessary evil. Bolt busses loading directly from the street is not a good solution.

That $5 bus ride would cost $1 these days on Megabus if you book well in advance.

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Yes I was thinking about that. Also a more pleasant bus experience to boot.

It’s virtually impossible to go to curbside, zero-shelter operations in Chicago because there’s so much transfer traffic. People can’t await onward buses standing on the sidewalk for hours in winter weather. Megabus can do curbside because it doesn’t sell trips involving connections.

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Greyhound is converting to a curbside model just like Megabus. They’ve already transitioned to curbside-only in Philadelphia, and they’ll do it in Chicago as well. The climate, the number of connections, the number of passengers, etc. - none of this will matter to Greyhound.

Because buses frequently run late, folks end up waiting for hours anyway, regardless of whether their journey begins in Chicago or they are just transferring between buses.

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Seems to me that the government should step in and mandate reasonably central full service transit hubs.

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