LOS ANGELES | LOW-RISE / GENERAL Development News + Construction

LOS ANGELES Low-Rise / General Development News + Construction

This thread is designated for miscellaneous low-rise projects of any stage in development. At YIMBY, low-rises are considered buildings of less then 10 stories (100 feet). Projects of 10 or more stories (100+ feet) are deserving of their own thread in the appropriate category. Significant projects of less than 10 stories (100 feet) are eligible to an individual thread. Los Angeles’s general development news can also be tracked here.

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Downtown Los Angeles Low-Rise Developments

Under Construction

G8 (Carmel Partners, Safai Architects, Seven Stories, 700 apartments, 50,000 sq. ft retail)

Archinect

Good Samaritan Medical Plaza and Outpatient Pavilion (Ware Malcomb, Seven Stories, 193,000 sq. ft.)

Downtown News

One Santa Fe (McGregor Company, Michael Maltzan Architects, Seven Stories 438 apartments, 78,000 sq. ft. retail)

Michael Maltzan Architecture

12th & Olive (Wolff Company, TCA Architects, Seven Stories, 293 apartments, 17,300 sq. ft. retail)

The Wolff Company

Olympic & Hill (Hanover Company, TCA Architects, Seven Stories, 287 apartments, 16,000 sq. ft. retail)

DTLA Rising

1000 Grand Avenue (Hanover Company, TCA Architects, Seven Stories, 275 apartments, 12,000 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

Olympic & Olive (Hanover Company, TCA Architects, Seven Stories, 263 apartments, 14,500 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

Little Tokyo Apartments (Sares-Regis Group, TCA Architects, Seven Stories, 240 apartments, 17,000 sq. ft. retail)
http://tcaarchitects.com/wp-content/themes/tca/assets/images/portfolio-arch-projects/block-8-parcel-d/block-8-parcel-d-large-01.jpg
TCA Architects

Avant Phase II (Century West Partners, GMP Architects, Seven Stories, 193 apartments, 9,500 sq. ft retail)

Building Los Angeles

Topaz (Jade Enterprises, Tate Snyder Kimsey, Seven Stories, 159 apartments, 23,000 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

Bixel & 6th (Holland Partner Group, Togawa Smith Martin, Six Stories, 606 apartments, 25,000 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

Da Vinci (G.H. Palmer Associates, Nelson/Boivin Architecture, Six Stories, 526 apartments, 14,000 sq. ft. retail)

G.H. Palmer Associates

East Village Apartments (Lowe Enterprises, Togawa Smith Martin, Six Stories, 320 apartments, 15,000 sq. ft. retail)

Los Angeles Times

1001 Olive Street (Lennar Corporation, KTGY Group, Six Stories, 201 apartments, 4,000 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

Blossom Plaza (Forest City, Johnson Fain, Five Stories, 237 apartments, 20,000 sq. ft. retail)

Curbed LA

New Pershing Hotel Apartments (Skid Row Housing Trust, Killefer Flammang Architects, Five Stories, 69 apartments, 3,800 sq. ft. retail)

DTLA Rising


Proposed

LA Plaza Block B (LPCAF, Johnson Fain, Eight Stories, 226 apartments, 20,000 sq. ft. retail)

Downtown News

College Station - Live/Work Building (Atlas Capital Investors, VTBS Architects, Eight Stories, 80 live/work apartments)

Building Los Angeles

SoLA Village - Low-Rise (PRH LA Mart, Gensler/PATTERNS, Seven Stories, 549 apartments, retail)

Los Angeles Times

Onyx (Jade Enterprises, TCA Architects, Seven Stories, 410 apartments, 30,000 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

12th & Grand (Wolff Company, TCA Architects, Seven Stories, 347 apartments, 20,000 sq. ft. retail)
http://static.squarespace.com/static/51dc38cce4b07ff05ee0849e/52705398e4b0ecb23c8da3a2/5278157ee4b0a6045d5a7c24/1383601554348/12th%20&%20Grand%20(Grand)%20-%20Electronic%20Rendering.jpg?format=1000w
The Wolff Company

The Project on Pico (Mack Urban/AECOM, A.C. Martin, Seven Stories, 360 condominium, 6,400 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

AMP Lofts (Bolour Associates, Shimoda Design Group, Seven Stories, 320 apartments, 20,000 sq. ft. retail)

Downtown News

5-OH - Low-Rise (MacFarlane Partners, Harley Ellis Devereaux, Seven Stories, 315 apartments, retail)

Building Los Angeles

Vibiana Lofts (Weintraub Group, Nadel Architects, Seven Stories [rendering outdated], 236 apartments, 3,600 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

12 (Forest City, Harley Ellis Devereaux, Seven Stories, 214 apartments, 8,000 sq. ft. retail)
http://archpaper.com/uploads/01-Herald-Examiner-DLANC-archpaper.jpg
Architect’s Newspaper

11 (Forest City, Harley Ellis Devereaux, Seven Stories, 178 apartments, 6,000 sq. ft. retail)
http://archpaper.com/uploads/image/03-Herald-Examiner-DLANC-archpaper.jpg
Architect’s Newspaper

Grand Metropolitan (Seven Stories, 160 apartments, 24,000 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

E. on Grand (4D Development, Seven Stories, 112 apartments, 5,000 sq. ft. retail)
http://la.curbed.com/uploads/1249%20Grand%20Ave.png
Curbed LA

1400 S. Figueroa Street (DHG Family Trust, GMP Architects, Seven Stories, 106 apartments, 3,350 sq. ft. retail)

Curbed LA

950 E. Third Street (Legendary Development/Associated Estates Realty, Six Stories, 472 apartments, 22,000 sq. ft. retail)

Downtown News

Chinatown Lofts (T.A. Patty Development, Six Stories, 318 live/work apartments)
http://archpaper.com/uploads/05-losangeles-cornfield-archpaper.jpg
Architect’s Newspaper

Broadway Palace Building A (G.H. Palmer Associates, Nelson/Boivian Architecture, Six Stories, 247 apartments, retail)

Downtown News

Valencia (Astani Enterprises, Killefer Flammang Architects, Six Stories, 218 apartments, 4,400 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

Industrial (Camden Property Trust, LOHA Architects, Five Stories, 240 live/work apartments)

DTLA Rising

LA Plaza Block A (LPCAF, Johnson Fain, Five Stories, 119 apartments, 35,000 sq. ft. retail)

Downtown News

College Station - Senior Housing (Atlas Capital Investors, VTBS Architects, Four Stories/100 senior apartment units, 22,00 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles


Recently Completed

Avant Phase I (Century West Partners, GMP Architects, Seven Stories, 247 apartments, 11,000 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

1111 Wilshire (Holland Partner Group, Nadel Architects, Seven Stories, 210 apartments, 8,000 sq. ft. retail)
http://propimages.apartments.com/100/12062/6031491_64.jpg
DTLA Rising

Ava Little Tokyo (Avalon Bay, TCA Architects, Six Stories, 290 apartments, 20,000 sq. ft. retail)
http://tcaarchitects.com/wp-content/themes/tca/assets/images/portfolio-arch-projects/block-8-ava-a/block-8-ava-a-large-01.jpg
TCA Architects

Jia Apartments (Equity Residential, TCA Architects, Six Stories, 280 apartments, 17,000 sq. ft. retail)
http://tcaarchitects.com/wp-content/themes/tca/assets/images/portfolio-arch-projects/jia/jia-large-01.jpg
DTLA Rising

Star Apartments (Skid Row Housing Trust, Michael Maltzan Architecture, Six Stories, 102 affordable apartments, retail)

Skid Row Housing Trust

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Hollywood Low-Rise Developments

Under Construction

Eastown LA (Clarett West, VTBS Architects, Four Buildings, Seven Stories, 535 apartments, 75,000 sq. ft. retail)

Curbed LA

Camden Hollywood (Camden Property Trust, TCA Architects, Seven Stories, 287 apartments, 40,000 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

Columbia Square Office (Kilroy Realty, Rios Clementi Hale, Two-to-Six Stories, 330,000 sq. ft. office, 30,000 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

Metropolitan West Apartments (Cornerstone Holdings, VTBS Architects, Six Stories, 79 apartments)

Building Los Angeles

1411 N. Highland Avenue (Lennar Corporation, Withee Malcolm Architects, Six Stories, 76 apartments, 2,500 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

959 Seward Street (J.H. Snyder Company, Ware Malcomb, Two Buildings, Four-to-Five Stories, 250,000 sq. ft. office)
http://marketing.joneslanglasalle.com/SouthWest/Listings/LAWest/959seward/images/photos/photo3.jpg
Hollywood 959

La Brea Gateway (Holland Partner Group, VTBS Architects, Five Stories, 179 apartments, 33,500 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

La Brea Regency Lofts (La Brea Regency LLC, Five Stories, 56 apartments, 9,000 sq. ft. retail)

GlobeSt

LC Apartments (California Landmark, PK Architects, Four Stories, 84 apartments, 3,500 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles


Proposed

6250 Sunset Boulevard (Essex Property Trust, Harley Ellis Devereaux, Seven Stories, 200 apartments, 4,700 sq. ft. retail)
http://harleyel.nextmp.net/resources/uploads/images/projects/2012_01270_000_706x4502.jpg
Harley Ellis Devereaux

Hotel Indigo - Highland Avenue (VTBS Architects, Seven Stories, 100 hotel rooms)
http://la.curbed.com/uploads/2013-03-indigo_highland.JPG
Curbed LA

The Lexington (DS Ventures, VTBS Architects, Six Buildings, Five-to-Six Stories, 786 apartments, 22,000 sq. ft. retail)

5550 Hollywood Boulevard (Astani Enterprises, PSL Architects, Six Stories, 280 apartments, 12,000 sq. ft. retail)
http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/536238fbf92ea12e2802e437/140429_1.jpg
Curbed LA

Highland & Selma (Champion Real Estate, Killefer Flammang Architects, Six Stories, 248 apartments, 35,000 sq. ft. office, 13,000 sq. ft. retail)
http://www.kfalosangeles.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/highlandselmaventure_mixed-use_710x310_slide1.jpg
Champion Real Estate

Hollywood Cherokee Apartments (Champion Real Estate, Withee Malcolm Architects, Six Stories, 225 apartments, 378 sq. ft. retail)
http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/515a24c8f92ea1436001bea5/View%20from%20las%20palmas.jpg
Curbed LA

925 La Brea (925 La Brea LLC, Shubin + Donaldson Architects, Six Stories, 50,000 sq. ft. office, 15,000 sq. ft. retail)

Building Los Angeles

1840 Highland Avenue (Nadel Architects, Six Stories, 118 apartments)

Building Los Angeles

7500 Sunset (Faring Capital, Killefer Flammang Architects, Two Buildings, Five Stories, 236 apartments, 30,000 sq. ft. retail)


Building Los Angeles

Sunset & Detroit (Isaac Cohanzad, Killefer Flammang Architects, Five Stories, 44 apartments, 2,950 sq. ft. retail)
http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/53335a69f92ea147850389ed/Screen%20shot%202014-03-26%20at%202.41.33%20PM.png
Curbed LA

The Academy - Office (Kilroy Realty, Shimoda Design Group, Three Buildings, Three-to-Four Stories, 100,000+ sq. ft. office, retail)
http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/53a313aef92ea14e3300bd48/Kilroy%20Unveils%20Plans%20for%20Hollywood%20Development.jpg
Los Angeles Times

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“Eight Cool Rooms,” a boutique hotel planned in East Hollywood, at the intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and St. Andrews Place. Six Stories, 80 guest rooms, 867 square foot ground floor restaurant. Designed by Atelier V Architecture.

Source: Building Los Angeles

New project in the Arts District

1800 E. 7th Street

Seven stories, 122 live/work lofts, ground-level retail.

Source: Building Los Angeles

Before (09/10)

After (12/10)

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wow!

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various projects in Koreatown, Los Angeles

pretty cool development on the west side of Los Angeles next to a metro station

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Per Craigs:
Rail line in southeast L.A. County approved as leaders seek to speed up construction


A Metro light-rail train passes the intersection of Jefferson and La Cienega boulevards in 2020.(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

Rachel Urgana
Los Angeles Times
January 28, 2022

Transportation officials gave the green light this week to a 19.3-mile light-rail line that would serve largely working-class Latino communities in southeast Los Angeles County, and agreed to look for ways to speed up the project slated for completion in 2043.

The line runs from Artesia northwest to Union Station, cutting through the cities of Cerritos, Bellflower, Paramount, Downey, South Gate, Cudahy, Bell, Huntington Park and Vernon. It would provide key connections to other lines, helping build out a rail system decades in the making.

But with costs ballooning to $8.5 billion — more than double the original estimate — the Metropolitan Transportation Authority decided to construct the project in two segments.

Local leaders have complained about the long wait for rail service.

“These are communities that need and deserve a project like this,” county Supervisor Janice Hahn, a Metro board member, said at a news conference on Friday. The poverty rate in the region is 47% and about 1 in 5 residents don’t have access to a car, according to Metro.

“I cannot help but be a little frustrated at how long it’s taken us to get to this point,” said Hahn, who represents areas of the southeast corridor. “These communities are in such high need, but I’ve seen other lines get prioritized.”

The rail line was part of Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti’s plan to build 28 transit projects by the 2028 Olympics.

The first 14.8-mile phase runs from Artesia along a former Pacific Electric right of way to Slauson Avenue and Long Beach Boulevard, where it would connect with the A (formerly Blue) line. Groundbreaking for the $4.9-billion phase is slated for next year and completion about 10 years later.

The second phase heads north 4.5 miles from the Slauson depot to Union Station and is set to be completed by 2043. About half of the line is planned to run underground through Little Tokyo, where Metro construction disrupted businesses for years and tunneling is driving up costs.

On Thursday, led by Hahn, the Metro board unanimously approved a plan that will look at cheaper alternatives to tunneling that could accelerate construction for the second phase. In an hours-long public comment period, dozens of elected officials representing the communities along the rail line pleaded with the board to speed up the timeline.

“We have been waiting too long,” said Maria Davila, a South Gate City Council member for 19 years. “We don’t have any other source of transportation in the corridor except for buses and the 710 [Freeway], which is always crowded.”

Davila said the project has been talked about for two decades. She is a founding board member of Eco-Rapid Transit, a joint powers authority created by southeast communities two decades ago to get a rail line built. “Hopefully I will get to see it in my lifetime.”

The rail line was a cornerstone of Measure M, a $120-billion half-cent sales tax approved by voters in 2016, which gained widespread support among elected officials in the region. Along with Measure R, approved in 2008, the tax fueled a rail construction boom.

Several changes to the original 2017 project drove up costs, including adding 2.3 miles of underground tunneling, aerial bridges over intersections, the relocation of utility lines and a transfer station to the C (formerly Green) Line at the 105 Freeway.

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From Touchthesky:
World’s Largest Wildlife Crossing Is Finally Under Way in Los Angeles

https://www.curbed.com/2022/01/wildl…s-angeles.html

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This is great news. We who love wildlife have been waiting a long time for this to be built. I live not far from it.

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Yes, it will bring a myriad of benefits even beyond the original intent of the structure, including increasing biodiversity and etc.
And with the 340 or so million in the infrastructure bill I hope to see a lot more projects like this go through.

If I recall correctly the vast majority of this project is privately funded. There has been a lot of locals who are against this project complaining of tax dollars or money in general being “waisted”. It has been (I think) at least 10 years since it was first proposed. Maybe longer.

Easily the best stadium and stadium area to be built in the US in a long while, by far.

This is interesting.

Per Pedestrian:

Quote:

Construction begins on $12 million mountain lion crossing on Highway 17 in Santa Cruz Mountains
By PAUL ROGERS progers@bayareanewsgroup.com Bay Area News Group
PUBLISHED: February 18, 2022 at 2:08 p.m. UPDATED: February 18, 2022 at 4:23 p.m.

For years, a sweeping, treacherous curve on Highway 17 through the Santa Cruz Mountains has posed risks for motorists zooming between Silicon Valley and Santa Cruz beaches.

But it’s been deadly for another group of travelers: Mountain lions, deer and other wildlife, which have been killed in surprisingly high numbers there while trying to cross the highway.

In a unique effort being watched by biologists around the state, crews on Wednesday began construction on a $12 million project to build an underpass for mountain lions and other wildlife under the four lanes of Highway 17 at Laurel Curve.

Ten years in the making, the project was made possible when the Land Trust of Santa Cruz County pieced together roughly 700 forested acres near the curve in multiple purchases. Funding came from private donations, Caltrans contributed $3 million, and $5 million came from county transportation funds.

“It’s a critical chokepoint for wildlife,” said Sarah Newkirk, executive director of the Land Trust of Santa Cruz County. “We’re anxious to see this project get off the ground.”

On average 65,000 vehicles a day race over the hair-raising curves of Highway 17. The drivers cross the San Andreas Fault and bisect redwood forests along the roadway, a former stage coach route that dates back to the 1850s. All of that traffic through the forest comes at a cost to wildlife and people.

Roughly 350 animals were killed on Highway 17 in collisions with vehicles between 2012 and 2017, including four mountain lions attempting to cross the high-speed traffic at Laurel Curve. Another nine mountain lions were killed on Highway 17 from 2000 to 2012, according to data from Pathways for Wildlife, a Los Gatos firm that uses Caltrans collision data, remote cameras and other sources.

There are roughly 60 mountain lions in the Santa Cruz Mountains, and Highway 17 is their largest source of mortality, said Chris Wilmers, a professor of environmental studies at UC-Santa Cruz who tracks mountain lions.

Not only do such accidents kill wildlife, they often cause thousands of dollars of damage to vehicles and can cause injuries or even human deaths . . . .

Here in Ventura county the local paper reported last week that there will now be an effort to build another wildlife crossing in the Newbury Park area of The City of Thousand Oaks approximately 7 miles from the Liberty Canyon wildlife crossing that will start construction this year. Both will be crossing the 101 FWY connecting the Santa Monica mountains with the back country of Ventura County and neighboring LA County.

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