NEW YORK l 40 East End Ave l ? FT l 18 FLOORS

This one looks like demo just started.

Found a rendering here: (looks decent)

http://bravobuildersnyc.com/portfolio/40-east-end-avenue/

From 1/28

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Already 3 floors up

Tec

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Credit: FC

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I can see East End Avenue becoming a hot spot within the UES. The fact that it used to be a trek to get to the subway from East End has changed at least somewhat with the opening of the Second Avenue subway line. At the same time it still retains the feel of a quiet, safe, family-friendly oasis within the already exclusive UES neighborhood.

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By the way, 40 East End is being developed by Lightstone, the same developer behind 130 William.

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222

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I’d imagine this one is close to complete, if not already.

Answered my own query.

image

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Credit: FC

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I walked by this building recently: understated beauty. These type of buildings that are tastefully designed and well built are actually quite the exception. I think is good to shower those efforts with well deserved praise when we see all this lovely features: masonry facade, mottled brick colors, punch windows, subtle and varied set-backs. RAM is know for this type of residential condo: but these developers/architects have even done better that RAM - more original detailing. RAM is great, but a complete copy artist from classical architectural text books: Palladio Redux.

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I completely agree with you there. Great word for it, lol. I like RAMSA’s work, but what ruins it for me is the panel facades where you can see the seams and how bland the middle sections can be. The beauty of his work is in the crown. But works like this have way more detail. I’d say the same of the work of Roman and Williams.

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I hate that they have no retail on the ground floor, facing a major street. It just deadens the street. It could very well be the fault of poor zoning though.

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Yes, that area is zoned for residential only. I do think that there is a nice affect that ‘residential’ zoned streets in Manhattan help create: walking the streets in those areas and observe the vast difference to commercially zoned areas - generally quieter, and cleaner, among other nice qualities. The Zoning regulations in NYC were quite well conceived IMHO. So we differ on that point - glad no commercial on ground floor. On another note: I have notice a vast amount of empty storefronts thought Manhattan - something is way wrong.

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Exactly. East End Ave is a quiet, residential enclave – both for its lack of retail and the way it’s cut off on both ends (by 79th St and FDR Dr respectively) – and that accounts for much of its charm. In fact, it almost has the air of a gated community, which no doubt is part of what makes it such a desirable location for many people.

Still, it doesn’t get too “dead” thanks to the foot traffic Carl Schulz Park generates.

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Between 40 East End and 20 East End, I’d still take an apartment in 20. But the more modern fenestration is definitely a plus on 40, especially those upper floor views of the river.

This neighborhood isn’t supposed to have retail. That might attract people from outside the neighborhood. Groceries and whatnot would be delivered through the service door by the kitchen.

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Having quiet dead streets kind of defeats the purpose of living in Manhattan. There are plenty of side streets that are not commercial so for those seeking quiet, there is plenty to choose from. Major arterials should have commercial.

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