NEW YORK | Congestion Pricing

Lawsuits galore

Lower Manhattan is quite possibly the most transit-rich piece of land in the western hemisphere. Rockland county has multiple train stations and park and ride facilities (dispersed throughout the small county) that feed directly into the city.

I’m absolutely convinced the people crying about “equity” and “unconstitutional discrimination” are people who have no idea what those words actually mean and just don’t feel like taking a train or bus.

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I’m sure they have convenient access to transit but refuse because “personal freedom” or whatever bs these detractors of this kind of stuff try to cook up to try and justify driving everywhere despite there being abundant transit options.

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I think it is rooted in self centeredness.

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The pattern in London was it became a status symbol to drive in the congestion zone.

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Unfortunately, this will not go direct to the US Supreme Court, as it is not a suit between the states (over which the high court has original jurisdiction). It’s taking the slow route to SCOTUS.

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At this point, i think the best chance congestion pricing has is if Steve Fulop wins next year’s NJ gubernatorial race. He’s openly supportive of it because he understands basic transportation principals.

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Oh I’m sure NJ will use the money to mitigate the “effects” of the toll and not divert it to expand their highways. :roll_eyes: There should be a stipulation that the money should go to NJ Transit but I know that probably wouldn’t pass legal muster.

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I had the misfortune of riding NJ transit last year and was shocked at how dated the interior of the trains looked. It was like riding in a train from way before my time. They certainly need the money, but that’s for another topic of discussion.

Why? Why would you want to mitigate “impacts”? The impacts are the entire point. You want the impacts.

Tbf those were probably the arrow 3 electric units, which aren’t the majority of the fleet anymore. They’re definitely dated looking but they can run without a diesel locomotive and there’s institutional knowledge on how to maintain them so NJT’s approach to them has been “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” since replacing rolling stock is wildly expensive if it’s not an absolute necessity.

That being said, they’re systematically being replaced by comet v cars and NJT has a contract with Bombardier to develop a similar, self-propelled version of the multi-level cars already in use.

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It would make more sense to divert it to PATH but that might stir up legal debate as well.

Ideally, that’s what “mitigating impacts” looks like: investing on the Jersey side to give drivers more alternatives to get into Manhattan. Could come in the form of more connecting bus services, first/last-mile street improvements, increased frequencies, 24-hour service, expanding park-and-ride facilities, etc.

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