Discussion | How is a skyscraper built these days?

If you have ever wondered how a skyscraper is planned and built, you can ask your questions here.


How is a skyscraper built?
How are column cross sections calculated?
Wind load calculations and what types of wind bracing are there?

6 Likes

Why are we not building more ‘mass timber’ structures in USA. This is ‘better’ than structural steel, and concrete slab superstructure methods.

3 Likes

How is it “better” than either of those?

The look, feel, ease of assembly, renewable resource, lower cost, lower carbon emissions; among other reasons.

Oh, Thermo, seismic factors, superior insulation capabilities - and more…

The video posted goes into some more detail as to why this is better than structural steel frame, or reinforced concrete. I love this method.

1 Like

Europe and Canada have already built some really interesting large-scale mass timber buildings. It’s only a matter of time before a mass timber skyscraper is built, there are already a few timber high-rises completed, and even taller ones are proposed. NYC recently legalized mass timber construction to a height of six stories or 85 feet, which is a start. Unfortunately red tape still keeps a lot of American cities behind the curve with cutting-edge construction technology like this.

https://www.dezeen.com/2021/10/13/new-york-timber-buildings/

1 Like

That surprised me: my assumption was we don’t build like that because it is not legal/approved in NYC. I believe the “red tape” factor will keep this new building method out of NYC for some time to come. I is obvious that the steel industry, iron workers, and concrete construction interests have a strong incentive to keep this new method from gaining popularity.

The only practical question - given the current state of affairs - will be about the existing methods of construction. I often wonder why some buildings get built with a structural steel superstructure, and others of the same size/type get made with reinforced concrete.

They both make for a strong building superstructure; but one is eventually chosen over the other for some unknown reason. :confounded:

1 Like

Timber skyscraper under construction in Milaukee

2 Likes

Why is the Millennium Tower in San Francisco sinking?

1 Like

Is that an actual question or just an invite to read the articles?


Saw some really odd construction in Mexico.

1 Like

That, looks terrible. And extremely weak.

1 Like

You think that looks weak you should see their electrical grid. The local wires running between poles looks like someone threw a ton of spaghetti into the air. I was in Acapulco a few years ago and there was a power pole standing 3 feet into a road at a curve! crazy stuff. Thankfully the taxi driver knew it was there!

it’s just a question no more.

1 Like

Hmm, pretty sure this video explain it well.

1 Like